Abstract Syntax and Abstracted Syntax

Musicology of Electroacoustic Music [MEM]  >  Discourse within Electroacoustic Music  ]

Abstract Syntax refers to the manner in which compositional material may be organised according to formal principles, extrinsic to the sonic nature and characteristics of the material itself. Abstracted Syntax refers to the extraction of structuring principles according to what is perceptually perceived as of pertinence within the material itself. The pairing was proposed by Simon Emmerson, in ’The Relation of Language to Materials’ in Emmerson, S., ed. (1986). The Language of Electroacoustic Music. (Basingstoke: Macmillan Press), in which he proposes a continuum between the two. The pair is also related to Aural/Mimetic Discourse.

 

See also:

Architectonic, Aural Discourse and Mimetic Discourse, Formalism, Musique Concrète, Schaefferian Theory

 

Bibliography:

English - Español - Français - Deutch - Italiano

Alphabetical order - Chronological order

Alvarez, Javier (1989). Rhythm as Motion Discovered
Barrière, Jean-Baptiste (1989). Computer Music as Cognitive Approach: Simulation, Timbre and Formal Processes
Boehmer, Konrad (2002). Koenig - Sound Composition - {Essay}
Dack, John (2002b). Abstract and Concrete
Decroupet, Pascal, Ungeheuer, Elena (2002). Through the Sensory Looking-Glass: The Aesthetic and Serial Foundations of {Gesang der Jünglinge}
DeLio, Thomas (2002). {Diamorphoses} by Iannis Xenakis
Emmerson, Simon (1982). Analysis and the Composition of Electro-Acoustic Music
Emmerson, Simon (1986). The Relation of Language to Materials
Kohl, Jerome (2002). Serial Composition, Serial Form, and Process in Karlheinz Stockhausen’s {Telemusik}
Licata, Thomas (2002a). Luigi Nono’s {Omaggio a Emilio Vedova}
Solomos, Makis (2004). Xenakis’ Thought Through his Writings
Twombly, Kristian (2002). Oppositional Dialectics in Joji Yuasa’s {The Sea Darkens}
Ungeheuer, Elena, Decroupet, Pascal (1998). Through the Sensory Looking-glass: the Aesthetic and Serial Foundations of {Gesang des Jünglinge}
Wishart, Trevor (1986a). Sound Symbols and Landscapes

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